Bikes get amended ordinance in Lake Worth

LAKE WORTH — Lake Worth Commissioners unanimously approved an amended bicycle ordinance at Tuesday’s meeting that will allow Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office deputies to ensure bike riders are operating their bicycles safely.

The ordinance will allow any abandoned bicycles to be removed after 48 hours. The recovered bikes will be stored in a secure location until claimed or discarded, according to city purchasing policy.

The ordinance will make it unlawful for any person to ride a bicycle upon any railway platform or pedestrian way within the city. It will also be against the law to ride a bike upon or across any railway tracks within the corporate limits.

The city said it wants to clarify regulations on abandoned bikes since they are a nuisance and clutter sidewalks and public right-of-ways.

The ordinance also allows for the removal of abandoned, deserted or vacated bikes on any city street, public way or city grounds.

More than 400 people recently arrested in Lake Worth

LAKE WORTH — More than 400 bad guys were arrested in the city from mid-May to mid-June, 186 coming from the Operation Perfect Storm gang unit task force.

“Overall crime is down,” Todd Baer, a Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office’s captain told City Commissioners at tonight’s meeting.

To deal with the gang violence issue, the sheriff’s office’s gang unit started a 30-day operation that targeted some of the city’s worst areas — 9th Avenue South, South G Street area, Washington Avenue area, 15th Avenue South, 19th Avenue North area and the Dixie Highway corridor.

Here are some of the results:

  • 186 arrests
  • 12 gang members arrested
  • 4 weapons seized
  • 1054 grams of marijuana; 37.1 grams of cocaine; 49.6 grams of crack cocaine; 54.5 grams of heroin seized
  • $11,796 recovered

“We’ve been watching the crime trends,” Baer said.

 

Check back later for a more detailed story

 

 

 

 

 

No tuition increase at PBSC for sixth straight year

LAKE WORTH — Tuition at Palm Beach State College will not increase for the sixth straight year, maintaining the college’s standing as one of the most affordable higher education institutions in the state.

The PBSC District Board of Trustees approved the college’s $129.9 million general fund budget for the 2017-2018 fiscal year. It calls for in-state tuition and fees to remain at $101 (including $76.92 for tuition) per credit hour or $303 for a three-credit hour course.

Tuition and fees for postsecondary adult vocational program courses are fixed at $83.40 per credit hour and $2.78 per contact hour. The cost of bachelor’s degree courses, regulated by the Florida Legislature, remains at $122.85 per credit hour or $368.55 for a three-credit hour class.

“It’s good for the students this year,’’ said Richard Becker, vice president of administration and business services, in a statement.

Becker presented the budget to the trustees at their meeting July 11.

While technology and capital improvement fees rose slightly twice, and the student activity fee rose once, Palm Beach State’s tuition has remained flat for six years. To compare, in 2012-2013, students paid $98.25 per credit hour or $294.75 for a three-credit hour course.

The move by trustees helps keep the cost of a college education affordable for students and their families, which has been an initiative pushed by Gov. Rick Scott. It also comes in the midst of growing dialogue about the mounting national student loan debt, now at a reportedly $1.4 trillion.  A new state law went into effect on July 1 requiring colleges and universities to give students detailed annual reports on their federal student loan debt so they can keep track of what they owe.

 

Do you want to be Miss Oktoberfest? Here’s how you can do it

LAKE WORTH — The American German Club needs your help.

The organization is still searching for its Miss Oktoberfest 2017 for its annual pageant and coronation gala Aug. 12.

It’s not too late to apply. The last day is July 21.

Click here to download the application.

 

Kevin Hart coming to Lake Worth…sort of

LAKE WORTH — Looking for a free movie to watch Friday night?

The city has one.

“The Secret Life of Pets” is scheduled to air at dusk at the Cultural Plaza, 414 Lake Avenue, during Screen on the Green.

The event is free.

Why is the FWC honoring this Lake Worth resident?

LAKE WORTH — Philip Stone, a law enforcement officer with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), has received the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation Award for Marine Conservation.

“He exemplifies all that Guy Harvey and our foundation stand for — an unwavering lifetime commitment to understanding, conserving and appreciating the irreplaceable creatures that inhabit our oceans,” Greg Jacoski, the foundation’s executive director said in a statement.

Philip Stone

Stone, who lives in Lake Worth, was honored for his dedication, particularly to the protection of sea turtles, at the FWC Commission meeting in Orlando.

As an FWC officer, Stone has worked with local law enforcement agencies to minimize impact to nesting and hatchling turtles while they conduct essential nighttime beach patrolling. He also helped Palm Beach and Martin county businesses and homeowners reduce coastal lighting that can disorient turtle hatchlings, luring them away from the ocean.

When off duty, Stone continues to serve as a sea turtle volunteer, conducting nesting surveys, responding to sea turtle strandings, and ­­­­­– as a volunteer and officer – helping recover sick or injured turtles.

Founded by marine biologist and artist Guy Harvey, the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation is an organization of philanthropists, conservationists, scientists and educators focused on developing sensible strategies for promoting the conservation of our oceans and nurturing the next generation of marine scientists and guardians of our seas.

How can you get cooler at Hoffman’s Chocolates?

In celebration of National Ice Cream Day, Hoffman’s Chocolates will offer a special buy one ice cream cup or cone, get one ice cream cup or cone free (of equal or lesser value) promotion on Sunday.

Hoffman’s Chocolates is not only offering the offer on National Ice Cream Day, but it’s also celebrating National Ice Cream Month with the continuation of its “Two Buck Tuesday Ice Cream,” where every Tuesday customers can enjoy one scoop of Hoffman’s ice cream for $2.00 per cup or cone.

As a bonus, from today through Sunday, guests can share a photo of themselves enjoying gourmet ice cream at a Hoffman’s Chocolates store on social media with the hashtag #CelebrateWithHoffmans, for a chance to win free ice cream for a year. Posts must be shared publicly on Twitter, Instagram, or posted on Hoffman’s Chocolate’s main Facebook page (@HoffmansChoc).

The winner will be announced on Monday, the company said.

Here’s a guide for the best ice cream in the county.

 

 

PBSC needs your help…it involves teeth

LAKE WORTH — The Florida Legislature recently allocated $5 million for a new facility for the dental health education programs at Palm Beach State College.

Now the college said it’s is looking for additional support.

The Dental & Medical Sciences Technology Building would replace the current 55-year-old structure at the suburban Lake Worth campus, allowing PBSC to incorporate current and future technology required in the core components of the Dental Hygiene Associate in Science degree and the Dental Assisting postsecondary adult vocational certificate programs, PBSC said.

The programs, both established in 1964, are the only such programs in Palm Beach County accredited by the American Dental Association, Commission on Dental Health, according to the college.

While the legislature put aside $5 million, the college said it was seeking about $22 million for a new building. PBSC said it will pursue more money from the state next year while also seeking community support.

The $5 million allows the planning phase to begin, PBSC said.

PBSC is scheduled to host a reception Thursday from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Center for Bachelor’s Programs (Room 103) on the campus west of Lake Worth for members of the dental community, the Program Advisory Council and alumni to provide a status update on the project and discuss ways for the community to get involved.

The event is free and open to anyone interested, but attendees must RSVP.

“This project is a priority because it prepares our dental program students and serves as a critical resource for people in our community who need access to low-cost dental care,’’ PBSC President Ava L. Parker said in a statement. “We need this project fully funded. We also need the community’s support to continue our efforts to secure funding.”

The facility is used as not only a training site for students, but also to provide continuing education for about 200 local dentists who are members of the Atlantic Coast Dental Research Clinic, which has been a partner of the college since 1964. Participating dentists of the nonprofit clinic provide low-cost dental treatment, including fillings, implants and oral surgery, to patients in the community, which also provides the required clinical training for the dental assisting students.

The Dental Hygiene Clinic, as well as the clinic used jointly by the Atlantic Coast Dental Research Clinic and the dental assisting students, were renovated in 1999 and 2002, respectively. However, the college said a 2008 study indicated that it would be more cost-effective to construct a new building than pursue additional renovations in order to plan and meet the growing demand for educating dental health professionals and the technology required to provide treatment on patients.

 

Need to learn how to be a property landlord? Lake Worth may show you

Vice Mayor Scott Maxwell believes some city property owners can benefit from taking a ‘How To Be A Landlord’ class Lake Worth is exploring.

LAKE WORTH — Lake Worth’s code compliance division has had its share of problems in recent years. But the city says it’s trying to address some of those problems.

One of the things the city is considering doing is offering a class that teaches property owners how to be a landlord.

At last week’s city commission meeting, Vice Mayor Scott Maxwell said West Palm Beach has one.

Maxwell said Lake Worth code officials recently attended the class with about 30 landlords. The officials spoke with West Palm Beach staff members later.

Maxwell said the city appeared willing to collaborate with Lake Worth on developing a similar class.

Stay tuned…

JUST IN: PBSO identifies man shot and killed in Lake Worth on north F Street

The area on the side of 914 N. F Street was roped off on June 17 after a Hispanic man was shot and killed. (Kevin D. Thompson/The Palm Beach Post)

 

LAKE WORTH — The Hispanic man shot and killed in the early morning hours on June 17 at 914 N. F Street has been identified as Jose Aquilar Juarez, according to the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office.

He was 46.

The sheriff’s office didn’t provide any additional information, saying the crime is still under investigation.

PBSO deputies received a “shots fired” call around 1:30 a.m on June 17. When deputies arrived, they found Aguilar dead from gunshot wounds. They also found another man with non life threatening injuries. That person was transported to a local hospital, PBSO said.

It was the second murder in Lake Worth this year and the 52nd in the the county, according to the Palm Beach Post’s homicide tracker

The shooting came two days after the Florida Department of Law Enforcement released its annual crime report that showed crime dipped slightly in Lake Worth in 2016, compared to the previous year.

The city reported 2,388 crimes in 2016, down from 2,465 in 2015.

While the number of murders increased 43 percent from 7 to 10, the city saw declines in the number of reported rapes, robberies, burglaries, larcenies and motor vehicle theft.

Residents, many of whom who are from Central America, have said the neighborhood has had its share of troubles with drugs, theft and public drinking.

“I don’t feel safe around here anymore,” one told The Palm Beach Post the day after the shooting.